Saturday, August 22, 2015

A Gift for Matthew


A lovely and meaningful book written by my friend Nick Muzekari.


Inline image 1


Matthew is excited to visit a monastery. A monk there is teaching him to paint icons! Matthew learns about sketching images, mixing pigments, and painting all the layers of the sacred images. And when he gets home, he finds a surprise gift just for him.

About the author: Nick Muzekari is a writer who lives in Hatfield, Pennsylvania, with his wife and five children. He enjoys conveying truth, mystery, and beauty through story. One of his most recent writing projects was a literary/art magazine for Christian teens which he founded and published. This is his first picture book.

About the illustrator: Masha Lobastov is a classically educated figurative artist. She graduated from the Russian State University for Humanities of Moscow in 1996 and moved to the U.S. to continue her artistic goals. Mostly known for her portraiture, especially children’s portraits, Masha collaborated with Ancient Faith Publishing and the authors E.C. Johnson and Jane Meyer in bringing to life the books And Then Nicholas Sang, What Do You Hear, Angel? and The Hidden Garden. This is her fourth picture book.

Format: Hardcover
Dimensions: 8 X 10 inches
Page Length: 32 pages
Publisher: Ancient Faith Publishing

To purchase go here.


Thursday, August 20, 2015

High Summer




August
Lizette Woodworth Reese


No wind, no bird. The river flames like brass.
On either side, smitten as with a spell
Of silence, brood the fields. In the deep grass,
Edging the dusty roads, lie as they fell
Handfuls of shriveled leaves from tree and bush.
But ’long the orchard fence and at the gate,
Thrusting their saffron torches through the hush,
Wild lilies blaze, and bees hum soon and late.
Rust-colored the tall straggling briar, not one
Rose left. The spider sets its loom up there
Close to the roots, and spins out in the sun
A silken web from twig to twig. The air
Is full of hot rank scents. Upon the hill
Drifts the noon’s single cloud, white, glaring, still.


Friday, August 14, 2015

In Defense of Kate Breslin's For Such A Time


Kate Breslin

Political correctness does hinder creativity. Nothing authentic and original comes out of social conformity.

In this interview with Vampire author Anne Rice she claims that attempts to ‘take down’ Kate Breslin’s concentration camp romance For Such a Time with bad Amazon reviews amounts to censorship.

It appears that some people don't like the fact that a main character in Breslin's concentration camp romance leaves Judaism and becomes a Christian and a Nazi officer finds redemption. The argument is that Breslin is trying to reframe history. Some people are too easily offended! Breslin wrote a romance that speaks of personal transformation. That's a subject we all should consider and take to heart.

Alice C. Linsley


Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Abe Lincoln Remembering and Remembered


"I have endured a great deal of ridicule without much malice; and have received a great deal of kindness, not quite free from ridicule. I am used to it."-- Abraham Lincoln

Bed where Abraham Lincoln died on 15 April 1865
He was pronounced dead at 7:22 am.



My Childhood Home I See Again
By Abraham Lincoln

My childhood home I see again, 
    And sadden with the view; 
And still, as memory crowds my brain, 
    There’s pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world 
    ‘Twixt earth and paradise, 
Where things decayed and loved ones lost 
    In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that’s earthly vile, 
    Seem hallowed, pure, and bright, 
Like scenes in some enchanted isle 
    All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye 
    When twilight chases day; 
As bugle-notes that, passing by, 
    In distance die away;

As leaving some grand waterfall, 
    We, lingering, list its roar— 
So memory will hallow all 
    We’ve known, but know no more.

Near twenty years have passed away 
    Since here I bid farewell 
To woods and fields, and scenes of play, 
    And playmates loved so well.

Where many were, but few remain 
    Of old familiar things; 
But seeing them, to mind again 
    The lost and absent brings.

The friends I left that parting day, 
    How changed, as time has sped! 
Young childhood grown, strong manhood gray, 
    And half of all are dead.

I hear the loved survivors tell 
    How nought from death could save, 
Till every sound appears a knell, 
    And every spot a grave.

I range the fields with pensive tread, 
    And pace the hollow rooms, 
And feel (companion of the dead) 
    I’m living in the tombs.

Monday, July 13, 2015

Review of Page Turner

Rayanne Sinclair

Page Turner is the second book by Rayanne Sinclair that I have read, the first being Steal Away (which I adored). This book, however, is officially my favorite. I loved the story from the beginning all the way to that beautiful, but ever so heartbreaking epilogue. I have never really loved epilogues so much before.

Page Holden was such a good character and so was Professor Weiss. From the first few scenes they had together, I wanted them to happen as a couple. Rayanne really knows how to write su Page Turner is the second book by Rayanne Sinclair that I have read, the first being Steal Away (which I adored). This book, however, is officially my favorite. I loved the story from the beginning all the way to that beautiful, but ever so heartbreaking epilogue. I have never really loved epilogues so much before.

Page Holden was such a good character and so was Professor Weiss. From the first few scenes they had together, I wanted them to happen as a couple. Rayanne really knows how to write such sweet romance that even I can feel the bubbly emotions from reading those cute moments. Now I just really want my own Weiss.

I also thought how interesting it was that Professor Weiss was a Jew and how his and Page’s relationship had progressed the way it did. It could have gone another way with John, had he been more receptive to faith.

Overall, I loved everything about Page Turner. It is a sweet Christian romance that stirs the emotions, even with some sadness.


Reviewed by Christina


Tuesday, June 30, 2015

"They die in Flanders..." Poem about high summer


Pinks and syringa in the garden closes
And the sweet privet hedge and golden roses.
The pines hot in the sun, the drone of the bee;
They die in Flanders to keep these for me.

The long sunny days and the still weather,
The cuckoo and the blackbird shouting together,
The lambs calling their mothers out on the lea;
They die in Flanders to keep these for me.

The doors and windows open: South wind blowing
Warm through the clean sweet rooms, on tip-toe going,
Where many sanctities, dear and delightsome be --
They die in Flanders to keep these for me.

Daisies leaping in foam on the green grasses,
The dappled sky and the stream that sings as it passes --
These are bought with a price, a bitter fee --
They die in Flanders to keep these for me.

Katharine Tynan
(1861 - 1931 )


Friday, May 29, 2015

Left Behind in France


Hiding Out
by Elizabeth Laird
written for ages 9-12 | recommended
published in 1994 (1993) | Mammoth | 208 pages




The Castles and the Fletchers are driving back through France to Calais and stop for a picnic. They leave in a hurry in their two cars, and Peter Castle is left behind. The parents have traffic problems and get different ferries so they don't realise their mistake until they reach England. Peter, meanwhile, decides to make a go of being stranded, finding things he can eat, lighting a fire and trapping fish, avoiding the local farmers. His father returns to France and mobilises the police who eventually find him.

The point-of-view shifts between the characters to create a nice balance of tensions, heightened by the communication problems of different languages. Peter faces up to his situation, and deals with his fears, mostly by recalling the advice or example of his father and grandfather. There is a subplot of the friendship between Mr. Castle and Mrs. Fletcher whose husband has just run off with his secretary, but this is suitably resolved and is the only thing which comes between the boy and his father when they are reunited.


Tim Golden is a computer programmer in London. This review first appeared on goodtoread.org

See more reviews of juvenile books at Mercatornet.com